FAQ/About

Frequently asked questions on our local March for Science

  • Can I bring food and drinks?
    Food and drinks are welcome! We’ll have recycle bins for plastic and paper, as well as trash cans. Alcohol and tobacco products are NOT permitted. Consider heading to lunch at one of our participating Cheers! Chat with a Scientist venues following the march. 
  • Will there be restrooms?
    We have one barrier-free portapotty for events at City Hall, 11 am to 1 pm, complete with hand sanitizer. Bathrooms are also open at the Soo Locks Visitor Center. 
  • Is this a free event?
    Yes! All of the Sault’s March for Science events are free to attend. Organizers have, however, spent hundreds of their own money to make the day possible. Please consider a donation on PayPal — search for us by our email, MarchForScienceSault@gmail.com — or a donation by cash or check anytime.
    Any leftover funds will go to the new Soo Locks Children’s Museum, which is in the works and will feature hands-on science, technology, engineering, arts, math and music exhibits for kids.
  • Can I bring my stroller or wheelchair?
    We are rallying in the parking lot on the water side of City Hall, which is barrier free. The march is .7-miles and is safe for stroller and wheelchair use. We will have 3 wheelchairs available to borrow, free of charge.  Please email MarchForScienceSault@gmail.com before April 22 if you plan to use one. 
  • How long is the rally and will there be seating?
    We estimate the rally will last 90 minutes or a little longer. We will not have seating available onsite, but feel free to bring your own lawn or camping chair if standing for long periods is not available (or enjoyable!) for you. 
  • Can we march in the streets?
    PLEASE NOTE We will be marching on the sidewalk along Portage Ave. until we cross Ashmun St. After Ashmun, we are able to march in the right-hand lanes all the way around and back to City Hall. Check out the route. 
  • Where should I park?
    Parking is available for free along the streets surrounding City Hall, and a small lot is available along Water St. No parking will be available immediately behind City Hall April 22 as the lot will be blocked off for the rally. And consider carpooling to reduce your carbon footprint, in honor of Earth Day!

About the national March for Science movement

MISSION STATEMENT
The March for Science champions robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good, and for political leaders and policymakers to enact evidence-based policies in the public interest.
Science protects the health of our communities, the safety of our families, the education of our children, the foundation of our economy and jobs, and the future we all want to live in and preserve for coming generations.
We speak up now because all of these values are currently at risk. When science is threatened, so is the society that scientists uphold and protect.

PRINCIPLES
a) Science that serves the common good. Scientists work to build a better understanding of the world around us. Science is a process, not a product — a tool of discovery that allows us to constantly expand and revise our knowledge of the universe. In doing so, science serves the interests of all humans, not just those in power. We must protect the rights of every person to engage with, learn from, and help shape science, free from manipulation by special interests.
b) Cutting-edge science education. We support science education that teaches children and adults to think critically, ask questions, and evaluate truth based on the weight of evidence. Science is not a field that should be understood only by a small few — every person, from every background, deserves an education that encourages scientific learning alongside the arts and humanities. Science works best when scientists come from diverse perspectives, and we must work to encourage and support a new generation of scientists that increasingly includes historically underrepresented groups.
c) Open, honest science communication and inclusive public outreach. Gag rules on scientists in government and environmental organizations impede access to information that is a public right. Our tax dollars support this scientific research and withholding their results limits the public’s ability to learn from the important developments and discoveries that we have come to expect from our scientists. In addition, scientists often rely on the public to help identify new questions that need to be answered.
d) Evidence-based policy and regulations in the public interest. Science observes and asks questions about the world. Our understanding is constantly changing, presenting us with new questions and answers. Science gives us the ability to examine these questions, enabling us to craft improved policies and regulations that serve our best interests. Political decision-making that affects the lives of Americans and the world at large should make use of peer-reviewed evidence and scientific consensus, not personal whims and decrees.
e) Federal funding for scientific research and its applications. De-funding and hiring freezes in the sciences are against any country’s best interests. We believe that the federal budget should reflect the powerful and vital role that science plays in supporting our democracy. We advocate federal funding in support of research, scientific hiring, and agency application of science to management. This funding cannot be limited to environmental and medical fields — scientific support must be inclusive of diverse disciplines.

GOALS
a) Humanize science. Science is first and foremost a human process — it is conducted, applied, and supported by a diverse body of people. Scientific inquiry is not an abstract process that happens independent of culture and community. It is an enterprise carried out by people who seek to expand our knowledge of the world in the hope of building a better, more informed society.
b) Support scientists. We gather together to stand up for fellow scientists, including those in public service. We pledge to speak up for them when they are silenced, to protect them when they are threatened and to provide them with support when they feel they can no longer serve their institutions. Scientists in both public and private sectors must be allowed to communicate their results freely, without misrepresentation or distortion and without the fear of retribution.
c) Advocate for open, inclusive, and accessible science. We strive to break down barriers in our own community. A career in science should be an option for anyone and everyone who is passionate about discovery. Likewise, the process and results of scientific inquiry should be open to all. Science can ably and accurately inform the decision-making of all people, from the choices we make as consumers to the policies we adopt through public debate. By bringing scientists to “teach-in” at the National Mall and in public spaces around the globe, we voice our support for science being freely available.
d) Partner with the public. We join together as scientists and supporters of science to embody the importance of partnerships formed between the lab and the broader community. Science works best when scientists share our findings with and engage the communities we serve in shaping, sharing, and participating in the research process. We also look to the public for inspiration about what new questions need to be asked about the world around us.
e) Affirm science as a democratic value. Science is a vital feature of a working democracy, spurring innovation, critical thinking, increased understanding, and better, healthier lives for all people. By marching in Washington, DC and around the world, we take one of many steps to become more active in our communities and in democratic life. We hold our leaders – both in science and in politics – accountable to the highest standards of honesty, fairness, and integrity. We gather together to send a message: we will all work to ensure that the scientific community is making our democracy stronger.

All material in “About” is from the national March for Science organization. 

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